Difference between revisions of "Radio"

From SatNOGS
(adding links, categories)
m
Line 1: Line 1:
{{DISPLAYTITLE:Software Defined Radio (SDR)}}
+
{{DISPLAYTITLE:Software Defined Radio}}
  
 
SatNOGS can use a variety of SDRs.  The most cost-effective solution is to use an RTL-SDR with a Raspberry Pi.  More advanced SDRs can also be used, but they require more processing power than what a Raspberry Pi can offer.
 
SatNOGS can use a variety of SDRs.  The most cost-effective solution is to use an RTL-SDR with a Raspberry Pi.  More advanced SDRs can also be used, but they require more processing power than what a Raspberry Pi can offer.

Revision as of 20:32, 2 February 2019


SatNOGS can use a variety of SDRs. The most cost-effective solution is to use an RTL-SDR with a Raspberry Pi. More advanced SDRs can also be used, but they require more processing power than what a Raspberry Pi can offer.

RTL-SDR: RTL2832U & R820T2-Based Software Defined Radios

SatNOGS uses the RTL-SDR as the default signal receiver and tuner. The RTL-SDR is based on two chips -- the versatile RTL2832U chip and the R820T tuner. The RTL-SDR is currently the cheapest, most common, and most performing solution available in terms of general sensitivity having a frequency range of 24 – 1766 MHz. A metal enclosure with SMA connector is preferred, along with a stable TCXO (low ppm). HF coverage is optional.

These RTL-SDR "dongles" are known to work with Raspberry Pi 2 or greater:

Advanced Software Defined Radios

The following advanced SDRs are supported by SatNOGS. These may require more processing power than a Raspberry Pi 3b can offer.

  • USRP b200
  • USRP2 (not compatible with the SatNOGS client on Raspberry Pi 3)
  • Airspy (not compatible with the SatNOGS client on Raspberry Pi 3)
  • HackRF One (not compatible with the SatNOGS client on Raspberry Pi 3)

References